Information for persons wishing to come to Lithuania with a pet animal

Travelling from the EU Member States to Lithuania

In order to come to Lithuania with a pet animal (dog, cat or ferret) from any of the EU Member States the obligatory requirements are:

  1. Identification.

The animal (dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip.

A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal.

The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal.

In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters.

Animals are microchipped by private veterinarians.

If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification check must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.

          2. Vaccine against rabies or the Declaration (in accordance with Article 7(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.

A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only provided that it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination.

If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply.

The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping.

The following animals can be brought to Lithuania from other EU Member States or third countries and areas (listed in Parts 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013):

- dogs, cats or ferrets under 12 weeks of age without vaccination;

- dogs, cats or ferrets of the age of 12–16 weeks, which were administered the vaccine against rabies provided that:

- the owner or a person authorised by him provides a signed declaration that from birth until the time of the non-commercial movement the pet animals have had no contact with wild animals of species susceptible to rabies (Regulation (EU) No 576/2013, Art. 7(2)(a) / Art. 11(2)(a);

- a female pet animal is travelling together with its litter, which is still dependant on it, and based on the identification document accompanying the female pet animal (pet passport or veterinary certificate) it is possible to trace that prior to the birth of the litter the pet animal had been vaccinated against rabies.

If animals are brought to Lithuania their further non-commercial movement to Member State is forbidden unless the following conditions have been met during the movement:

- the dog, cat or ferret is identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip;

- vaccinated against rabies;

- complies with all preventive health care measures laid down by Article 19(1) of Regulation 576/2013 aimed at protection against diseases or infections other than rabies;

- travels with an adequately completed and issued identification document.

! Even if all these conditions are met it has to be checked if the entry of this animal is allowed by the country of destination.

          3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate.

A pet passport is required for ravelling with a dog, cat or ferret in the EU (example).

If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate issued by an official veterinarian is required (example).


Travelling from third countries to Lithuania

Requirements for travelling to Lithuania from:

Andorra, Switzerland, Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Croatia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Vatican City State, Ascension Island, United Arab Emirates, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Aruba, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Barbados, Bahrain, Bermudas, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba (BES islands), Belarus, Canada, Chile, Curacao, Fiji, Falkland Islands, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Japan, St. Kitts and Nevis, Cayman Islands, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Mauritius, Mexico, Malaysia, New Caledonia, New Zealand, French Polynesia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Russia, Singapore, St. Helena, Sint Maarten, Trinidad and Tobago, Taiwan, the United States of America and their territories (AS – American Samoa, GU – Guam, MP – Northern Mariana Islands, PR – Puerto Rico, VI – United States Virgin Islands), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, British Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna, Mayotte).

  1. Identification.

An animal (a dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip.

A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal.

The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal.

In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters.

Animals shall be microchipped by private veterinarians.

If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification checks must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.

           2. Vaccination against rabies or Declaration.

A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only if it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination.

If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply.

The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping.

The following animals can be brought to Lithuania from other EU Member States or third countries and areas (listed in Parts 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013):

- dogs, cats or ferrets under 12 weeks of age without vaccination;

- dogs, cats or ferrets of the age of 12–16 weeks, which were administered the vaccine against rabies provided that:

- the owner or a person authorised by him provides a signed declaration that from birth until the time of the non-commercial movement the pet animals have had no contact with wild animals of species susceptible to rabies (Regulation (EU) No 576/2013, Art. 7(2)(a) / Art. 11(2)(a);

- a female pet animal is travelling together with its litter, which is still dependant on it, and based on the identification document accompanying the female pet animal (pet passport or veterinary certificate) it is possible to trace that prior to the birth of the litter the pet animal had been vaccinated against rabies.

If animals are brought to Lithuania their further non-commercial movement to Member State is forbidden unless the following conditions have been met during the movement:

- the dog, cat or ferret is identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip;

- vaccinated against rabies;

- complies with all preventive health care measures laid down by Article 19(1) of Regulation 576/2013 aimed at protection against diseases or infections other than rabies;

- travels with an adequately completed and issued identification document.

! Even if all these conditions are met it has to be checked if the entry of this animal is allowed by the country of destination.

       3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate with the Declaration

A pet passport is required for travelling with a dog, cat or ferret (example).

If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate with a Declaration issued by an official veterinarian is required (in accordance with Article 25(3) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013) http://ec.europa.eu/food/animal/liveanimals/pets/docs/reg_577_2013_part3_annex4_lt.pdf


Requirements for travelling from other third countries to Lithuania:

  1. Identification.

An animal (a dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip.

A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal.

The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal.

In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters.

Animals shall be microchipped by private veterinarians.

If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification checks must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.

        2. Vaccination against rabies.

A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only provided that it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination.

- If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply.

- The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping.

      3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate with the Declaration.

A pet passport is required for travelling with a dog, cat or ferret (example).

If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate with a Declaration issued by an official veterinarian is required (in accordance with Article 25(3) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013).

       4. Serology tests for rabies antibodies.

After at least 30 days of vaccination against rabies and with 3 moths remaining to entry to an EU Member State from a third country (not included in Part 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013/EU) a blood test of the animal has to be made in an approved laboratory.

The 3-month period does not need to be observed for pet animals that are repeatedly brought when an indication was made in their passports that a test had been carried out before they left from an EU Member State.

In Lithuania tests for the determination of rabies antibodies is carried out by the National Food and Veterinary Risk Assessment Institute.

Blood for testing has to be taken form an animal by an authorised veterinarian.

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