News

2016 m. June 22 d.
AThe grade of an Honorary Member was bestowed on Dr. Jonas Milius, Director of the State Food and Veterinary Service by Łomża-Ostrołęka Branch of the Polish Society of Veterinary Sciences. The honourable award is usually bestowed by the Society only on veterinarians with special merits for their major personal contribution to the development of the veterinary science on the national and international levels with the assessment of the nominees’ endeavours for the benefit of science and the veterinarian community as well as outstanding results of their activity. In his congratulatory speech a representative of the commission Dr. Emilian Kudyba pointed out that the grade of an Honorary Member had been bestowed on Dr. J. Milius with consideration of the outstanding merits of the head of the State Food and Veterinary Service in supporting and developing the veterinary science in Lithuania and promoting its close integration into other branches of science on the national and international levels, his active involvement in activities of international veterinary organisations and his support for bilateral cooperation. According to his words, thanks to organisational endeavours of the head of the State Food and Veterinary Service and his excellent personal qualities this cooperation was being successfully developed and over the past several years had already produced mutually beneficial results. In his comments on the recognition demonstrated by the Polish colleagues Dr. J. Milius was pleased that the longtime tradition of cooperation was the merit of many Lithuanian and Polish specialists. “Each veterinarian is aware of the old truth that diseases do not recognise borders. So, veterinarians cannot separate themselves from each other by creating boundaries. We must be open-minded, share our good practices, knowledge, exchange information, seek our common goals: to guarantee a high level of food safety for European consumers, create possibilities for the development of food export and ensure conditions for animal health and welfare”, – said Dr. J. Milius.
2016 m. June 21 d.
One of the final stages of the negotiations between competent authorities of Lithuania and Japan on the export of beef products has been reached. Furthermore, the intention is to carry out negotiations on the export of poultry meat and derived products in the near future. “The negotiations with Japanese institutions on the export of beef and beef products have been rather lengthy; the granting of export permission was a lasting process. This is because Japan is a country where extremely high and strict requirements are applied for the quality of food products. We have reached one of the final stages, therefore, I do expect that products from our country will find their way to Japanese tables”, – told Minister for Agriculture Ms Virginija Baltraitienė. Director of the State Food and Veterinary Service Dr. Jonas Milius pointed out that the accord that had been reached was a result of successful and close cooperation between institutions. “In the past year, the Ministry of Agriculture and our Service managed to establish particularly good business relations with colleagues in Japan. This facilitated and speeded up the course of the negotiations. I believe that procedures for the coordination of requirements for other animal origin products, for example, poultry meat will last substantially less as Japanese requirements are already familiar and clear to us, whereas, Japanese are sufficiently well familiar with the control system functioning in Lithuania, food safety and quality requirements”, – said Dr. J. Milius. Chancellor of the Ministry of Agriculture Ms Dalia Miniataitė and the delegation headed by her had a meeting with Mr Hiromichi Matsushima, Vice Minister of Japan for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries where they discussed the cooperation results in the field of science and business in the past year as well as future prospects. The Lithuanian delegation held a special seminar during which our national agriculture and dairy sectors were presented to representatives of Japanese associations, municipal authorities, food industry. There was also a meeting with Ambassador of the European Union Viorel Isticioaia-Budura on the course of the negotiations on free trade agreements. Technical issues related to meat and meat products were discussed at the meeting with representatives of the Animal Health Unit of the Bureau of Food Safety and Consumer Affairs of the Ministry of Japan for Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries. Trade with Japan accounts for a small part of the foreign trade of Lithuania in agricultural and food products. In 2015, the export of agricultural and food product to Japan accounted for EUR 26.0 million. Within the entire export structure, Japan occupied the 27 place out of 133. However, compared to 2014, the export increased by 39 per cent last year.  
2016 m. June 08 d.
Travelling from the EU Member States to Lithuania In order to come to Lithuania with a pet animal (dog, cat or ferret) from any of the EU Member States the obligatory requirements are: Identification. The animal (dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip. A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal. The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal. In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters. Animals are microchipped by private veterinarians. If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification check must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.           2. Vaccine against rabies or the Declaration (in accordance with Article 7(2)(a) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013. A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only provided that it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination. If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply. The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping. The following animals can be brought to Lithuania from other EU Member States or third countries and areas (listed in Parts 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013): - dogs, cats or ferrets under 12 weeks of age without vaccination; - dogs, cats or ferrets of the age of 12–16 weeks, which were administered the vaccine against rabies provided that: - the owner or a person authorised by him provides a signed declaration that from birth until the time of the non-commercial movement the pet animals have had no contact with wild animals of species susceptible to rabies (Regulation (EU) No 576/2013, Art. 7(2)(a) / Art. 11(2)(a); - a female pet animal is travelling together with its litter, which is still dependant on it, and based on the identification document accompanying the female pet animal (pet passport or veterinary certificate) it is possible to trace that prior to the birth of the litter the pet animal had been vaccinated against rabies. If animals are brought to Lithuania their further non-commercial movement to Member State is forbidden unless the following conditions have been met during the movement: - the dog, cat or ferret is identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip; - vaccinated against rabies; - complies with all preventive health care measures laid down by Article 19(1) of Regulation 576/2013 aimed at protection against diseases or infections other than rabies; - travels with an adequately completed and issued identification document. ! Even if all these conditions are met it has to be checked if the entry of this animal is allowed by the country of destination.           3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate. A pet passport is required for ravelling with a dog, cat or ferret in the EU (example). If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate issued by an official veterinarian is required (example). Travelling from third countries to Lithuania Requirements for travelling to Lithuania from: Andorra, Switzerland, Faroe Islands, Gibraltar, Greenland, Croatia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Vatican City State, Ascension Island, United Arab Emirates, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Aruba, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Barbados, Bahrain, Bermudas, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba (BES islands), Belarus, Canada, Chile, Curacao, Fiji, Falkland Islands, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Japan, St. Kitts and Nevis, Cayman Islands, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Mauritius, Mexico, Malaysia, New Caledonia, New Zealand, French Polynesia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Russia, Singapore, St. Helena, Sint Maarten, Trinidad and Tobago, Taiwan, the United States of America and their territories (AS – American Samoa, GU – Guam, MP – Northern Mariana Islands, PR – Puerto Rico, VI – United States Virgin Islands), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, British Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Wallis and Futuna, Mayotte). Identification. An animal (a dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip. A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal. The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal. In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters. Animals shall be microchipped by private veterinarians. If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification checks must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.            2. Vaccination against rabies or Declaration. A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only if it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination. If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply. The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping. The following animals can be brought to Lithuania from other EU Member States or third countries and areas (listed in Parts 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013): - dogs, cats or ferrets under 12 weeks of age without vaccination; - dogs, cats or ferrets of the age of 12–16 weeks, which were administered the vaccine against rabies provided that: - the owner or a person authorised by him provides a signed declaration that from birth until the time of the non-commercial movement the pet animals have had no contact with wild animals of species susceptible to rabies (Regulation (EU) No 576/2013, Art. 7(2)(a) / Art. 11(2)(a); - a female pet animal is travelling together with its litter, which is still dependant on it, and based on the identification document accompanying the female pet animal (pet passport or veterinary certificate) it is possible to trace that prior to the birth of the litter the pet animal had been vaccinated against rabies. If animals are brought to Lithuania their further non-commercial movement to Member State is forbidden unless the following conditions have been met during the movement: - the dog, cat or ferret is identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip; - vaccinated against rabies; - complies with all preventive health care measures laid down by Article 19(1) of Regulation 576/2013 aimed at protection against diseases or infections other than rabies; - travels with an adequately completed and issued identification document. ! Even if all these conditions are met it has to be checked if the entry of this animal is allowed by the country of destination.        3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate with the Declaration A pet passport is required for travelling with a dog, cat or ferret (example). If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate with a Declaration issued by an official veterinarian is required (in accordance with Article 25(3) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013) http://ec.europa.eu/food/animal/liveanimals/pets/docs/reg_577_2013_part3_annex4_lt.pdf Requirements for travelling from other third countries to Lithuania: Identification. An animal (a dog, cat or ferret) has to be identified by a tattoo if it had been made before 3 July 2011 or a microchip. A microchip is a chip of the size of a rice with a unique identification number assigned by the manufacturer. That number cannot be assigned to any other animal. The microchip is inserted under the skin by a special hypodermic needle and stays for ever. This procedure does not cause any local reaction within the implantation area for the animal. Moreover, it is absolutely harmless for the animal. In order to identify an animal a reader shall be placed at the spot of the microchip and the unique number, which can be used to identify the hosts of the animal, appears on the screen. Such microchip readers are available at many veterinary clinics and animal shelters. Animals shall be microchipped by private veterinarians. If the microchip is not in conformity with established technical requirements the owner or a person authorised by him in case of any identification checks must provide technical means required for reading the microchip code. The technical requirements are set out in Annex II to Regulation (EU) No 576/2013.         2. Vaccination against rabies. A dog, cat or ferret can be moved to another country only provided that it has been administered primary or booster vaccination against rabies and at least 21 days have passed from the vaccination. - If the immunisation is active (i. e. the booster is not yet required) the 21-day period shall not apply. - The date of vaccination against rabies must not be earlier than the date of microchipping.       3. Pet passport or veterinary certificate with the Declaration. A pet passport is required for travelling with a dog, cat or ferret (example). If an animal was born in a country other than the EU a veterinary certificate with a Declaration issued by an official veterinarian is required (in accordance with Article 25(3) of Regulation (EU) No 576/2013).        4. Serology tests for rabies antibodies. After at least 30 days of vaccination against rabies and with 3 moths remaining to entry to an EU Member State from a third country (not included in Part 1 and 2 of Annex II to Regulation 577/2013/EU) a blood test of the animal has to be made in an approved laboratory. The 3-month period does not need to be observed for pet animals that are repeatedly brought when an indication was made in their passports that a test had been carried out before they left from an EU Member State. In Lithuania tests for the determination of rabies antibodies is carried out by the National Food and Veterinary Risk Assessment Institute. Blood for testing has to be taken form an animal by an authorised veterinarian.
2016 m. June 02 d.
The State Food and Veterinary Service (SFVS) started providing public services in electronic environment – Integrated Food and Veterinary Information System (IMVIS). Documents issued by the SFVS, its territorial units, border inspection posts and National Food and Veterinary Risk Assessment Institute can be ordered and received without leaving home. It is convenient to pay the automatically generated invoices for public services rendered by the SFVS through the IMVIS. With the help of the IMVIS you can: 1. Adjust details of an activity carried out by a person or entity subject to SFVS control. 2. Find information about findings of inspections carried out by the SFVS at a specific establishment. 3. Order public services rendered by the SFVS, observe their performance, observe the history of documents issued by the SFVS and laboratory analyses carried out. 4. Print out documents issued by the SFVS. 5. Enter laboratory testing results for public drinking water supplies. 6. Have access to latest information on legal acts adopted by the SFVS and their amendments. A module of the Geographic Information System was installed in the IMVIS, which enables: 1. Viewing the wellfield map and published laboratory analyses results for drinking water. 2. Finding information on infected herds of animals and protection zones. 3. Following information on animals that were diagnosed with infectious diseases. 4. Finding out the health status of your cattle herd and data of analyses. IMVIS has a useful and technologically new property – a newly developed semantic search module, which, compared to the usual search for information on the internet, enables finding SFVS activity-related information significantly faster and easier. Furthermore, with the help of modern technologies (e. g. smart phones) IMVIS users can conveniently and rapidly contact the SFVS and other control institutions, receive prompt answers to questions whereas the integration of the IMVIS with information systems of other state institutions enables the SFVS managing common tasks and solving arising problems more rapidly and effectively. You can sign in to the IMVIS at https://imvis.vmvt.lt/
2016 m. June 01 d.
On 22–26 May, Director of the State Food and Veterinary Service (SFVS) Dr Jonas Milius and Attaché for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Representation of Lithuania to the European Union (EU) Mr Žilvinas Ilevičius participated at the 84th General Session of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in Paris. The representatives of Lithuania participated at the expert meeting organised by the Global Framework for Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases (GF TADs) on control of African swine fever (ASF) where information on the current situation in Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Poland, Russia and Ukraine was exchanged. Representatives from Romania and Moldova also participated at the meeting. In experts’ opinion those countries are under realistic potential ASF threat and risk, therefore, they must take advantage of the experience in other countries, which are already combating ASF, and implement the required measures. In his presentation at the meeting, Director of the SFVS Dr Jonas Milius pointed out that the fight against ASF in Lithuania had been appropriate as the situation in the country had been stable. This disease had not been detected in any pig keeping facilities for a substantial period of time and the virus in wild fauna was not spreading into new regions. Dr. J. Milius assured the participants that the implemented measures, i. e. the collection of wild boar carrions and their destruction, the selective hunting of female wild boars had been efficient and produced concrete results. Director called for urgent discussion of the issue of strengthening the control of biosafety requirements at small-size farms on the European level and for planning the potential co-financing for the implementation of those measures under the EU budget. Furthermore, Dr. J. Milius thanked the representatives of the European Commission for comprehensive assistance, coordination, support in the process of combating ASF and made a proposal to organise an additional meeting in Lithuania to discuss the ASF developments this year. The common opinion of the meeting was that the spread of ASF in Ukraine was the top concern of the moment (7 outbreaks in pig farms and 2 in wild fauna have been recorded this year) and there was a potential risk of this disease in the neighbouring countries (Romania and Moldova).

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2015 y. March 06 d.
Events

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Naujienos

2016 m. June 22 d.

The grade of an Honorary Member was bestowed on Dr. Jonas Milius, Director of the State Food and Veterinary Service by Łomża-Ostrołęka Branch of the Polish Society of Veterinary Sciences.

 

2016 m. June 21 d.

One of the final stages of the negotiations between competent authorities of Lithuania and Japan on the export of beef products has been reached. Furthermore, the intention is to carry out negotiations on the export of poultry meat and derived products in the near future.

2016 m. June 08 d.

Which documents and which vaccines are obligatory for travelling to Lithuania with a pet animal?

2016 m. June 02 d.

The State Food and Veterinary Service (SFVS) started providing public services in electronic environment – Integrated Food and Veterinary Information System (IMVIS). Documents issued by the SFVS, its territorial units, border inspection posts and National Food and Veterinary Risk Assessment Institute can be ordered and received without leaving home.

2016 m. June 01 d.

On 22–26 May, Director of the State Food and Veterinary Service (SFVS) Dr Jonas Milius and Attaché for Veterinary and Phytosanitary Representation of Lithuania to the European Union (EU) Mr Žilvinas Ilevičius participated at the 84th General Session of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) in Paris.